Tony Amaradio On How to Manage Debt Through Faith

Those overburdened by debt are often forced to turn to consolidators and creditors for assistance.

Aliso Viejo, CA - March 26, 2020 /MarketersMedia/ —

People and families would prefer not spending more money than what they make. But, when debts are accumulated, they also need to be repaid after a while. The inspirational financial strategist and founder of Select Portfolio Management, Tony Amaradio, examines this responsibility, and the various aspects of being economical in a faithful manner. By implementing diligent fund management and dedicated stewardship, unwanted debts can be resolved through a spiritually fulfilling process that benefits the entire family.

Those overburdened by debt are often forced to turn to consolidators and creditors for assistance. In doing so, only the symptoms are treated, not the formed habits that caused the financial shortcomings. Amaradio suggests that individuals should instead turn to their churches, a surprisingly exceptional source of consultation for responsible and faithful wealth management. With non-mortgage debt eclipsing $2.4 trillion nationwide, religious establishments, Christian radio stations and community outreach groups have begun supplementing financial counsel into their spiritual messages. The senior pastor of Southeast, one of the largest nondenominational churches in the country with over 18,000 worshippers each weekend, believes it is his obligation to do so, “For a church not to provide a service for people who are suffocating from too much debt would be equivalent to burying our head in the sand.” More than 39,000 churches currently offer a mix of basic budget planning, household cost cutting, and deficit management techniques.

Faith based debt reduction provides rules to force changes in spending and saving, and turns to the Bible for context and motivation. In order to be a good steward, God requires the responsible management of capital, as it is all his, “The earth is the Lord’s, and everything in it.” Psalm 24:1. Amaradio notes that the largest difference between Christian and secular financial planning is the importance placed on tithing and generous giving. Even in times of economic hardship, one-tenth of all household income should be given to the Lord. Philanthropy is also seen as a way to show devotion, and if at all possible, should be incorporated into any budget as a priority. Debt consolidation, however, is not recommended, because it benefits the lender more than the borrower, and statistics show that over three quarters of credit card debt grows back after being consolidated. By committing to a faith based, written plan, overspending habits can be successfully changed and debt can be successfully paid off.

Tony Amaradio is a financial expert, philanthropist, and the founder of two innovative firms, Select Portfolio Management, Inc. and Select Money Management, Inc. After years of assisting clients in establishing, planning, and managing assets, Amaradio recognized the need for a comprehensive, integrated wealth management system. As a result, his handpicked team is responsible for the development and implementation of the most advanced financial and tax strategies available today. In 2009, he and his wife co-authored, “Faithful with Much: Breaking Down the Barriers to Generous Giving.” The inspirational book received exceptional reviews, and shares the couple’s compelling journey to understanding God’s will about money and possessions.

Anthony Amaradio - Visionary & Strategic Philanthropist: http://anthonyamaradionews.com

Tony Amaradio - The Best Thing You've Ever Done! on Vimeo: https://vimeo.com/313895972

Anthony Amaradio - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Anthony-Amaradio-580623782054204/

Contact Info:
Name: AAN
Email: Send Email
Organization: AnthonyAmaradioNews.com
Website: http://www.anthonyamaradionews.com

Video URL:

" target="_blank">

Source URL: https://marketersmedia.com/tony-amaradio-on-how-to-manage-debt-through-faith/88951229

Source: MarketersMedia

Release ID: 88951229

Recent News

Threat to US elections not limited to Russia in 2020

Apr 4, 2020

WASHINGTON — Russia interfered in the 2016 election and may try to sway next year's vote as well. But it's not the only nation with an eye on U.S. politics. American officials sounding the alarm about foreign efforts to disrupt the 2020 election include multiple countries in that warning. Concerns abound not only about possible hacking of campaigns, but also about the spread of disinformation on social media and potential efforts to breach voting databases and even alter votes. The anxiety goes beyond the possibility that U.S. adversaries could directly affect election results: The mere hint of foreign meddling could...

3 get Nobel prize for showing how cells sense low oxygen

Apr 4, 2020

NEW YORK — Two Americans and a British scientist won a Nobel Prize on Monday for discovering details of how the body's cells sense and react to low oxygen levels, providing a foothold for developing new treatments for anemia, cancer and other diseases. Drs. William G. Kaelin Jr. of Harvard University, Gregg L. Semenza of Johns Hopkins University and Peter J. Ratcliffe at the Francis Crick Institute in Britain and Oxford University won the prize for advances in physiology or medicine. The scientists, who worked largely independently, will share the 9 million kronor ($918,000) cash award, said the Karolinska Institute...

Where have the wild birds gone? 3 billion fewer than 1970

Apr 4, 2020

WASHINGTON — A comprehensive study shows there are nearly 3 billion fewer wild birds in North America than in 1970. The new study finds that the bird population in the United States and Canada was probably around 10.1 billion nearly half a century ago and has dropped 29% to about 7.2 billion birds. Study lead author Kenneth Rosenberg, a Cornell University conservation scientist, says the thinning of the flocks is happening before our eyes but is so slow we don't often notice. Rosenberg and colleagues projected population data using weather radar, which captures flocks of migrating birds, 13 different bird...

No Deal: Auto workers strike against GM in contract dispute

Apr 4, 2020

DETROIT — More than 49,000 members of the United Auto Workers walked off General Motors factory floors or set up picket lines early Monday as contract talks with the company deteriorated into a strike. Workers shut down 33 manufacturing plants in nine states across the U.S., as well as 22 parts distribution warehouses. It wasn't clear how long the walkout would last, with the union saying GM has budged little in months of talks while GM said it made substantial offers including higher wages and factory investments. It's the first national strike by the union since a two-day walkout in...

Union votes to strike at General Motors' US plants

Apr 4, 2020

DETROIT — The United Auto Workers union announced Sunday that its roughly 49,000 workers at General Motors plants in the U.S. would go on strike just before midnight because contentious talks on a new contract had broken down. About 200 plant-level union leaders voted unanimously in favor of a walkout during a meeting Sunday morning in Detroit. Union leaders said the sides were still far apart on several major issues and they apparently weren't swayed by a GM offer to make new products at or near two of the four plants it had been planning to close, according to someone...

About Us

Science Buzz is a user-friendly website which concentrates on news for the Big Three: Biology, Chemistry, and Physics.

Contact us: sales@thescnbuzz.com